UFOs

This is a page dedicated to Unidentified Found Objects (UFOs). Occasionally people contact the Provincial Archaeology Office because they have found artifacts while clearing their land, putting in a new garden or recreational diving etc. Sometimes these artifacts even puzzle us. Can you help us identify these objects?

18 thoughts on “UFOs

  1. Brad Loewen

    I see a fox head, a “shell edge” pattern on the rim, and a laurel wreath around the fox head. It could be a 19th-century hunt club shield or platter, stamped with the club’s insignia. It’s different from the Montreal Hunt Club insignia, which includes golf clubs.

    The archaeological context is kind of vague.

    1. nlarchaeology

      Thanks Brad. I can see the same kind of thing. A 19th-century hunt club shield or platter is an interesting idea. The archaeological context is kind of vague because very little information was provided to us.

  2. Amanda Crompton

    My first thought was the fox and wreath might be some kind of military insignia. A quick google search found a few WWII era fox mask badges that resemble it in a very broad sense, though I don’t know that any of them make sense in a Newfoundland context (No. 12 squadron RAF, 8th armoured brigade, British Army). In my years running the field school at Signal Hill, digging in 19th century British military contexts, I certainly don’t recall any buttons/badges etc with similar insignia. Still: interesting find, and the UFOs are a great addition to the blog!

    1. nlarchaeology

      Thanks
      Yeah, I’ve had a few responses emailed to me and they seem to be leaning toward a Military origin for the artifact.

  3. Donna Teasdale

    I think the artifact in question may be a copper crumb tray. The owner did a Google search and came up with an example being sold at the Eastbourne Auction House. I have an image but can’t figure out how to post it.

  4. CarrieannBurt

    It turns out to be a copper crumb tray stylized with an embossed fox head. I think the origins are from somewhere in the late 1800’s to early 1900’s.

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